Wednesday, May 17, 2006

I Fell Off The Wagon And Joined AAA...

Fade In:

No, not the automobile protection society, but rather the Access, Acclaim, Achievement screenwriting contest put on by Creative Screenwriting Magazine (one of the two must-read bibles of the industry.) I entered my drama/horror script "The Barber In A Seville" so next Sept I'll anxiously await results for this and the Nicholl's first cut.

Query: Does every writer actually think their screenplay will be made into a movie, or should we be treating it more as an example of our writing style? I always hear of writers holding out for years until they get a good deal/set up on their script, but wouldn't it be better to grab some writing assignments out of it first? Let your "baby" go out into the world and develop, cut the apron strings after your writing got your foot in the door and allowed you to be welcomed to play The Game?

Oh, don't get me wrong, as is everyone's want.
I'd love to be negotiating an option or wait by the phone as my spanking new agent sends my blood, sweat and tears out (BTW, I want that cd back on Monday, I play "Spinning Wheel" every morning while I dress.) But, I'd also just be happy someone recognizing I have a wee bit of talent in my left pinkie that can be exhumed, exploited and exhausted to the fullest exhalations of an exuberant studio. I want to work in the industry itself, not just sit at home on my sundeck sipping coffee typing on my laptop, wait a sec

Which brings up another question. How many of you are actively seeking, or are open to, employment within the LA based Hollywood screenwriting community? If the "call" comes by land, sea or water (insert pitch meeting, email query and telephone chat)will you answer? Or are you just content with entering some cash-quick contests, stay attuned to your local film communities and festivals. Writing being a serious hobby in your life but not necessarily a "drop everything and run to LA" sort of career choice.

Sidebar, even though it's at the bottom.

I am reading the Matrix script and wow, talk about descriptive writing. Some of the best I have had the pleasure of burning my retinas on.


It is a place of putrefying elegance, a rotting host of urban maggotry.

Fade Out

Monday, May 1, 2006

He Got To Manhandle Eva Longoria...

Fade In:

A shout out to a really nice writer slash SAG member known to some of us as Formosus and some as
The Angry Anthropologist . This lucky S.O.B got to fondle Eva Longoria last night on Desperate Housewives. He was the cop who held her back when they took the baby away at the end of the episode. How many takes did you make them do, Steve? Good luck on your burgeoning acting career

Can I be Frank for a sec... Scott Frank that is, because after reading this way cool
interview with him I realize my writing methods are similar, which to me is cool. I took a year to nail down my recent opus and a lot of people told me I spent too much time on it, that I should have done three scripts in that period of time. But, the people that told me this should look at themselves in the mirror and realize that maybe the reason they aren't selling or winning anything is because maybe, just maybe they rushed theirs out way too soon.

I especially love this part, here is a professional that takes his time so I don't feel so bad now.

                        Then, since writing is rewriting,
                        let's talk about your writing
                        process.  How many drafts does it
                        take to get to a first draft?


                        All rewrites?

                        All rewrites.

                        Over how much time?

                        I don't know, it's usually, off and
                        on, working on something for about
                        a year before I have a first draft.

                        How about "official" drafts, five
                        or fifteen?

                        Closer to fifteen.

                        How do you know you're finished?

              Scott smiles.

                        I'm never finished.
                        Let's start at the
                        open up page one, FADE IN:, you
                        write the first day, what's your
                        process after that?

                        I rewrite as I go.  I always
                        rewrite what I did yesterday to get
                        me into my work today.  I'll start
                        at the beginning sometimes and I'll
                        go through the script up to where
                        I'm at right now and then I work
                        for a while and add another brick.
                        Then, I'll go back and work on all
                        the other bricks, then I add
                        another brick.

Fade Out